• Anonymous 7 months ago

    why should firewall have open port in linux server?

  • Chat GPT

    Firewalls are designed to prevent unauthorized access to a server by blocking incoming traffic from potentially malicious sources. However, there may be certain situations where it is necessary to open specific ports on a Linux server's firewall to allow traffic through.

    Here are a few reasons why a firewall may have an open port in a Linux server:

    1. Application-specific ports: Some applications require specific ports to be open in order to function properly. For example, a web server typically requires ports 80 (HTTP) and 443 (HTTPS) to be open to serve web pages.

    2. Remote access: If you need to access your server remotely, you may need to open certain ports to allow remote connections. For example, you may need to open SSH port (22) to allow remote access to the command line interface.

    3. VPN connections: If you are using a VPN to access your server, you may need to open the necessary ports to allow VPN traffic through.

    4. File sharing: If you need to share files between computers, you may need to open ports to allow file sharing protocols such as NFS or Samba.

    In general, it is important to be cautious when opening ports on a firewall, as this can expose your server to potential security risks. It is recommended to only open ports that are absolutely necessary and to regularly monitor your server's security to ensure that there are no unauthorized access attempts.

  • Anonymous

    when I give firewall cmd to list open ports, it doesnt list any. what does that mean?

  • Chat GPT

    If you have executed the command to list open ports on your Linux server's firewall and no ports are listed, it means that your firewall is configured to block all incoming traffic, including traffic on the well-known ports used by various network services. This is a common security practice, as it reduces the attack surface of your server and makes it less vulnerable to network-based attacks.

    However, keep in mind that not all Linux firewall tools provide the same output format. For example, the "iptables" command and the "firewalld" command both use different options to display the list of open ports. Therefore, you may want to try different commands to see if you get different results.

    In any case, if you need to allow incoming traffic to a specific service, you can configure your firewall to allow traffic on the appropriate port. Just be sure to do so cautiously and only open the ports that are necessary for the services you require.

  • Anonymous

    if i open port 2804, that means it is outgoing or incoming?\

  • Chat GPT

    When you open port 2804 on a firewall, it generally means that you are allowing incoming traffic to that port. In other words, your server or device is now able to receive traffic from external sources on that port.

    However, it's important to note that the terms "incoming" and "outgoing" can be a bit confusing when dealing with firewalls. This is because the perspective depends on which side of the firewall you're on.

    From the perspective of your server or device, opening port 2804 would allow incoming traffic. From the perspective of an external device trying to connect to your server or device, the traffic would be outgoing.

    So, if you're configuring a firewall and want to allow incoming traffic to a specific port, you would need to open that port on the firewall. If you want to allow outgoing traffic on a specific port, you would need to configure the firewall to allow outbound traffic on that port.

  • Anonymous

    I have a service hosted on my windows machine at 2804. My linux machine is a remote server, and I have opened port 2804 at firewall. The service discovery presnet in remote server has registered with my windows IP address. The api gateway queries my eureka (service discovery) for the service. When it finds my IP, will it route through to my windows service? Please tell me what else could be wrong.

    The service is registered as http://<:2804/<>

    When api gateway calls eureka will it be able to identify the windows IP.

    Please note that ping of windows IP from linux machine is not working. What else to do?

  • Chat GPT

    If the API gateway is querying your Eureka service discovery instance for the service and it finds the IP address of your Windows machine, it should be able to route traffic to the service running on port 2804 on that machine.

    However, if you are unable to ping the IP address of your Windows machine from your Linux server, this suggests that there may be a network connectivity issue between the two machines. Here are some things you can check:

    1. Check your firewall settings: Make sure that your Windows firewall is not blocking incoming traffic on port 2804. You may need to create a rule to allow incoming traffic on that port.

    2. Check your network configuration: Ensure that both machines are on the same network or that there is a route between the two networks. Check that the network interface on both machines is configured correctly, with the correct IP address and subnet mask.

    3. Check your router or switch configuration: If your two machines are on different networks, check that your router or switch is configured to allow traffic between them. Make sure that any necessary routing rules or NAT configurations are in place.

    4. Check your DNS configuration: Ensure that your DNS resolver is able to resolve the hostname of your Windows machine to its IP address correctly.

    If you have checked all of these things and are still unable to establish a connection, it may be helpful to run some network diagnostic tools such as traceroute, ping or netstat to get more information about where the connection is failing.

  • Anonymous

    Ensure that both machines are on the same network or that there is a route between the two networks. Check that the network interface on both machines is configured correctly, with the correct IP address and subnet mask.

    Help me how to check this

  • Chat GPT

    To check whether both machines are on the same network or whether there is a route between the two networks, you can use the traceroute command on your Linux server to trace the route to your Windows machine. Here's how:

    1. Open a terminal on your Linux server.
    2. Type traceroute <<Windows_IP_address>> and press Enter.
    3. The traceroute command will show you the route that network packets take from your Linux server to your Windows machine, including any intermediate routers or switches along the way. Look for any hops that fail to respond or show a high latency, as these may indicate a network connectivity issue.

    To check the network interface configuration on both machines, you can use the ipconfig command on Windows and the ifconfig command on Linux. Here's how:

    1. On your Windows machine, open a command prompt.
    2. Type ipconfig and press Enter. This will show you the IP address, subnet mask, and other network interface information for your machine.
    3. On your Linux server, open a terminal.
    4. Type ifconfig and press Enter. This will show you the IP address, subnet mask, and other network interface information for your Linux server.

    Make sure that the IP address and subnet mask are configured correctly and match the expected values for both machines. If they don't match, you may need to reconfigure your network settings on one or both machines.

    Finally, if you are using DNS to resolve the hostname of your Windows machine, you can use the nslookup command on your Linux server to check the DNS resolution. Here's how:

    1. Open a terminal on your Linux server.
    2. Type nslookup <<Windows_hostname>> and press Enter. This will show you the IP address associated with the hostname.
    3. Verify that the IP address returned by nslookup matches the expected IP address for your Windows machine. If it doesn't, there may be an issue with your DNS configuration.

  • Anonymous

    verified traceroute and its fine. Is DNS required? I am registering with IP address and not the hostname

  • Chat GPT

    If you are registering your service with the IP address and not the hostname, then DNS resolution is not required for the service discovery process to work. However, if you are still unable to establish a connection to your Windows machine from your Linux server, it may be helpful to try connecting using the hostname instead of the IP address.

    If you do decide to use a hostname for your Windows machine, you will need to ensure that the hostname is resolvable from your Linux server. This can be done by either adding the hostname to your /etc/hosts file on the Linux server or by setting up a DNS server to resolve the hostname.

    In any case, it's always a good idea to use a hostname instead of an IP address where possible, as it can make your network configurations more flexible and easier to manage.

  • Anonymous

    #### <751299b985b9> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '0' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <> <> <132137f9-9926-4684-a1f8-a4ad3ced15e4-00000023> <1682671440882> <[severity-value: 8] [rid: 0] > freemarker.core.InvalidReferenceException: The following has evaluated to null or missing:
    ==> replica.key [in template "eureka/navbar.ftlh" at line 68, column 62]

    ----
    Tip: It's the step after the last dot that caused this error, not those before it.
    ----
    Tip: If the failing expression is known to legally refer to something that's sometimes null or missing, either specify a default value like myOptionalVar!myDefault, or use <#if myOptionalVar??>when-present<#else>when-missing. (These only cover the last step of the expression; to cover the whole expression, use parenthesis: (myOptionalVar.foo)!myDefault, (myOptionalVar.foo)??
    ----

    ----
    FTL stack trace ("~" means nesting-related):
    - Failed at: ${replica.key} [in template "eureka/navbar.ftlh" at line 68, column 60]
    - Reached through: #include "navbar.ftlh" [in template "eureka/status.ftlh" at line 22, column 7]
    ----
    at freemarker.core.InvalidReferenceException.getInstance(InvalidReferenceException.java:134)

  • Chat GPT

    This error message is related to a FreeMarker template used in the Eureka server for service discovery. It seems that the variable replica.key evaluated to null or is missing when the template was processed, causing the error.

    Without more context and information about your specific setup, it's difficult to provide a more detailed explanation or solution. However, some possible causes of this error include:

    • Issues with the configuration or deployment of the Eureka server or its dependencies.
    • Issues with the data being provided to the FreeMarker template, such as missing or invalid values.
    • Issues with the FreeMarker template itself, such as syntax errors or incorrect usage of variables.

    To troubleshoot this error, you may need to check the logs of your Eureka server or other relevant components, examine the data being provided to the FreeMarker template, and review the template code for errors or issues.

  • Anonymous

    #### <751299b985b9> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '0' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <> <> <132137f9-9926-4684-a1f8-a4ad3ced15e4-00000023> <1682671440882> <[severity-value: 8] [rid: 0] > freemarker.core.InvalidReferenceException: The following has evaluated to null or missing:
    ==> replica.key [in template "eureka/navbar.ftlh" at line 68, column 62]

    ----
    Tip: It's the step after the last dot that caused this error, not those before it.
    ----
    Tip: If the failing expression is known to legally refer to something that's sometimes null or missing, either specify a default value like myOptionalVar!myDefault, or use <#if myOptionalVar??>when-present<#else>when-missing. (These only cover the last step of the expression; to cover the whole expression, use parenthesis: (myOptionalVar.foo)!myDefault, (myOptionalVar.foo)??
    ----

    ----
    FTL stack trace ("~" means nesting-related):
    - Failed at: ${replica.key} [in template "eureka/navbar.ftlh" at line 68, column 60]
    - Reached through: #include "navbar.ftlh" [in template "eureka/status.ftlh" at line 22, column 7]
    ----
    at freemarker.core.InvalidReferenceException.getInstance(InvalidReferenceException.java:134)

    Can it be caused by wrong server.port

  • Chat GPT

    No, the error you posted does not seem to be caused by the wrong server port. It appears to be a Freemarker template error related to a null or missing value for the variable "replica.key" in the eureka/navbar.ftlh template at line 68, column 62. The error message suggests that you may need to specify a default value or use an if-else statement to handle the case when the variable is null or missing.

  • Anonymous

    can opening firewall port cause eureka issue?

  • Chat GPT

    Opening a firewall port may not directly cause an issue with Eureka, but it can indirectly affect the communication between the Eureka server and its clients if not configured properly.

    For example, if a firewall is blocking a port that Eureka server or client uses for communication, then the communication will be disrupted. In such a case, opening the required port on the firewall can solve the issue.

    However, if the firewall is opened for an incorrect port or service, it may expose the server to potential security risks or cause issues with other applications running on the server. Therefore, it is essential to configure the firewall correctly and only open the necessary ports for Eureka to function properly.

  • Anonymous

    firewall-cmd --list-all
    public
    target: default
    icmp-block-inversion: no
    interfaces:
    sources:
    services: dhcpv6-client ssh
    ports:
    protocols:
    masquerade: no
    forward-ports:
    source-ports:
    icmp-blocks:
    rich rules:

    Explain this after that I will ask my doubts

  • Chat GPT

    This is the output of the command "firewall-cmd --list-all", which lists the current firewall configuration for the "public" zone. Here's what the different options mean:

    • target: The default target for the zone. In this case, it is set to "default", which means the default behavior is to drop incoming packets that don't match any of the other rules. Other possible values are "ACCEPT" and "DROP", which would respectively accept or drop all incoming packets.
    • icmp-block-inversion: If set to "no", ICMP packets (ping requests, for example) will be blocked. If set to "yes", ICMP packets will be allowed.
    • interfaces: Lists the network interfaces that are part of the zone.
    • sources: Specifies the IP addresses or subnets that are allowed to connect to the machine. If empty, all sources are allowed.
    • services: Specifies the services that are allowed to connect to the machine. In this case, the "dhcpv6-client" and "ssh" services are allowed.
    • ports: Lists the specific ports that are allowed to connect to the machine. If empty, no ports are allowed.
    • protocols: Lists the protocols that are allowed to connect to the machine. If empty, all protocols are allowed.
    • masquerade: If set to "yes", outgoing traffic will appear to come from the machine's IP address rather than the IP address of the sending machine.
    • forward-ports: Specifies the ports to forward to other machines. If empty, no ports are forwarded.
    • source-ports: Specifies the source ports that are allowed to connect to the machine.
    • icmp-blocks: Specifies the types of ICMP packets that are blocked.
    • rich rules: Specifies advanced rules for the zone.

    Let me know if you have any doubts.

  • Anonymous

    if firewalld is off, discovery is starting, else discovery is not starting. Why?

  • Chat GPT

    If the firewalld service is enabled and running, it may be blocking the necessary ports for Eureka discovery to work properly. By default, Eureka uses port 8761 for service discovery and registration, so if this port is blocked by the firewall, Eureka won't be able to start.

    When the firewalld service is turned off, it means that there are no firewall rules in effect, and thus the ports that Eureka needs are not blocked. This allows Eureka to start and function properly.

    If you want to keep firewalld enabled, you need to make sure that the necessary ports for Eureka are open. You can do this by adding the appropriate firewall rules to allow traffic on those ports. You can use the firewall-cmd command to add the rules. For example, to allow incoming traffic on port 8761, you can run the following command:

    css
    sudo firewall-cmd --add-port=8761/tcp --permanent

    This will add a rule to allow incoming TCP traffic on port 8761, and make the rule persistent so it survives a reboot. After adding the rules, you can restart the firewalld service to make sure the changes take effect:

    sudo systemctl restart firewalld

    Once you have added the necessary firewall rules, Eureka should be able to start and function properly, even with firewalld enabled.

  • Anonymous

    ok so if firewalld is off, that means any port that is mapped in docker network can listen to a remote server?

  • Chat GPT

    No, disabling firewalld only means that the firewall rules are not enforced, but it doesn't change the network configuration or security. If a port is mapped in a Docker network, it can only be accessed by other containers on the same network or by the host machine, depending on the configuration of the Docker network.

    If you want to allow external access to a Docker container, you need to publish the container's port to the host machine and then configure the host machine's firewall to allow incoming traffic on that port. This is typically done using the -p or --publish option when starting the container and then configuring the firewall rules accordingly.

    It's important to note that opening ports for external access can potentially expose your system to security vulnerabilities, so it should be done with caution and only when necessary.

  • Anonymous

    suppose my service is in windows machine, and I am registering a service in eureka in linux machine with windows IP address and port 2803. and docker (that is present in the same linux machine of eureka ) has -p2803:2803 already, that means it will listen to my windows IP? In windows firewall I have a rule that allows incoming traffic to 2803. Firewalld is turned off in linux machine ? What else might be going wrong please.

  • Chat GPT

    If the Docker container is running on the same Linux machine where Eureka is running and you have published the port 2803 of the container to the host machine's port 2803 using the -p option, then the container should be able to listen to traffic on the host machine's IP address on port 2803.

    If the Windows machine is reachable from the Linux machine, and the Windows firewall is allowing incoming traffic to port 2803, then there should be no issues with communication. However, you need to make sure that you are using the correct IP address of the Windows machine while registering the service with Eureka. Also, make sure that the Eureka client running in the Windows machine is able to reach the Eureka server running on the Linux machine.

    If you are still facing issues, you can try to use tools like telnet or nc to test the connectivity between the Windows machine and the Linux machine on port 2803. You can also check the logs of the Eureka server and client to see if there are any error messages that might be helpful in identifying the issue.

  • Anonymous

    eureka is not running in windows, its running in linux. eureka is part of docker setup on linux.

    Help me test connectivity please.

    give me commands, with <> referring to windows IP address, and 100.76.131.24 as linux IP. Please give everything I need to check. You are my only hope.

  • Chat GPT

    Here are some commands that you can use to test connectivity between your Windows machine and Linux machine:

    1. Check if the Linux machine can ping the Windows machine:
    bash
    ping <<windows_IP>>

    If you receive responses from the Windows machine, it means that the Linux machine can connect to the Windows machine.

    1. Check if the Windows machine can ping the Linux machine:
    ping 100.76.131.24

    If you receive responses from the Linux machine, it means that the Windows machine can connect to the Linux machine.

    1. Check if a specific port is open on the Windows machine:
    bash
    telnet <<windows_IP>> 2803

    If the command connects successfully, it means that the port 2803 is open and accepting connections on the Windows machine.

    1. Check if a specific port is open on the Linux machine:
    yaml
    telnet 100.76.131.24 2803

    If the command connects successfully, it means that the port 2803 is open and accepting connections on the Linux machine.

    1. Check if the Linux machine can connect to the Windows machine using the specified port:
    bash
    telnet <<windows_IP>> 2803

    If the command connects successfully, it means that the Linux machine can connect to the Windows machine using port 2803.

    1. Check if the Docker container running on the Linux machine can connect to the Windows machine using the specified port:
    bash
    docker run --rm -it busybox telnet <<windows_IP>> 2803

    If the command connects successfully, it means that the Docker container can connect to the Windows machine using port 2803.

    These commands should help you test the connectivity between your Windows and Linux machines and identify any potential issues.

  • Anonymous

    Linux cannot ping windows, but windows can ping linux. but traceroute is fine if I give windows IP, now modify your response accordingly

  • Chat GPT

    If Linux cannot ping Windows, but Windows can ping Linux, it could be a network configuration issue.

    To test connectivity between the Windows machine and the Eureka server running in the Docker container on the Linux machine, you can try the following commands:

    1. From the Linux machine, try to ping the Windows machine:

      bash
      ping <<windows_ip>>

      If this command fails, it indicates that there is a network configuration issue on the Linux machine that is preventing it from reaching the Windows machine.

    2. From the Windows machine, try to ping the IP address of the Docker container running Eureka:

      ping 100.76.131.24

      If this command fails, it indicates that there is a network configuration issue on the Windows machine that is preventing it from reaching the Docker container running Eureka.

    3. From the Windows machine, try to access Eureka using its IP address and port number:

      arduino
      curl http://100.76.131.24:8761/eureka/

      If this command fails, it indicates that there is a network configuration issue preventing the Windows machine from reaching the Docker container running Eureka. You may need to check firewall settings on both the Windows and Linux machines, as well as any network configuration settings.

  • Anonymous

    point 1 is not working, help me with it

  • Chat GPT

    If ping is not working from Linux to Windows, it could be due to a few reasons such as firewall rules or network misconfiguration.

    You can try the following steps to troubleshoot:

    1. Check the firewall rules on the Windows machine to ensure that it's not blocking incoming ICMP traffic. You mentioned that you have a rule that allows incoming traffic to port 2803, but you should also check for rules related to ICMP traffic. You can do this by opening "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and looking for rules related to ICMP.

    2. Check the network configuration on both machines to ensure that they are on the same subnet and that the gateway is configured correctly.

    3. Check if there is any network equipment such as switches or routers between the two machines that could be blocking the traffic.

    4. Try using other tools to test the connectivity such as telnet or nc. For example, you can try to telnet to port 2803 on the Windows machine from the Linux machine to see if the port is open.

    If you're still having issues, you may need to provide more information such as the network configuration and firewall rules for both machines, and any error messages you're seeing.

  • Anonymous

    icmp-block-inversion was no if firewalld was on, i set firewalld as off. Now is that fine?? If yes, how to rectify without causing further trouble

  • Chat GPT

    If you have turned off firewalld, then the firewall is no longer active and it will not block any incoming or outgoing traffic. However, turning off the firewall is not a recommended security practice, as it can leave your system vulnerable to various attacks.

    If you want to rectify the issue without causing further trouble, you should configure your firewall rules to allow incoming traffic on the required ports, rather than turning off the firewall completely. You can do this by adding firewall rules for the ports that you want to allow traffic on.

    For example, if you want to allow incoming traffic on port 2803, you can run the following command to add a firewall rule:

    css
    sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=2803/tcp --permanent

    This will add a rule to allow incoming TCP traffic on port 2803 in the public zone and make it permanent, so that the rule will be automatically applied after a system reboot.

    After adding the rule, you can reload the firewall to apply the changes by running:

    css
    sudo firewall-cmd --reload

    This should allow incoming traffic on port 2803 and should enable Eureka to communicate with your service running on the Windows machine.

  • Anonymous

    if I turn on firewalld , eureka was not coming up buddy

  • Chat GPT

    If you are sure that turning on firewalld is causing the issue with Eureka not coming up, then you need to check your firewall rules and make sure that the necessary ports for Eureka are open. You can do this by adding a rule to the firewalld configuration to allow traffic on the port that Eureka is running on. Here are the steps to add a rule to firewalld:

    1. First, check the port number that Eureka is running on. You can do this by looking at the configuration file for Eureka or by checking the logs when Eureka starts up.

    2. Once you know the port number, you can add a rule to the firewalld configuration to allow traffic on that port. The command to add a rule for port 8080, for example, would be:

      css
      firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=8080/tcp --permanent

      This command adds a permanent rule to allow traffic on port 8080.

    3. After you have added the rule, reload the firewalld configuration to make sure the new rule is applied:

      css
      firewall-cmd --reload
    4. Finally, check that the new rule is in place by listing the rules:

      css
      firewall-cmd --list-all

      You should see the new rule listed in the output.

    If you are still having issues with Eureka after adding the necessary rules, then you may need to check other settings, such as the network configuration or any other firewalls that may be in place.

  • Anonymous

    i dont want firewalld on thats final, but if ping is not working, could it be due to icmp-block-inversion? If its not due to icmp-block-inversion, how to check?

  • Chat GPT

    Yes, if you are not able to ping the Windows machine from the Linux machine, it could be due to the ICMP packets being blocked by the Windows Firewall. In this case, disabling the firewall or creating a new rule to allow ICMP traffic can help.

    If the issue still persists after disabling the firewall, you can check if the two machines are on the same network and can communicate with each other. You can try the following:

    1. Check the IP address and subnet mask of both machines using the ipconfig command on Windows and the ifconfig command on Linux.

    2. Make sure both machines are on the same subnet. If not, you may need to configure the network settings accordingly.

    3. Try to ping other machines on the same network from both machines to see if the issue is specific to the Linux-Windows communication.

    4. Check if any network-level firewalls or security groups are blocking the communication between the two machines.

    5. If you have access to the network infrastructure, you can check the routing and forwarding rules to ensure that traffic is being correctly routed between the two machines.

    I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any further questions.

  • Anonymous

    how to check subnet mask of linux machine

  • Chat GPT

    You can check the subnet mask of a Linux machine by running the following command:

    sql
    ip addr show

    This will display the network interfaces configured on the machine along with their IP addresses and subnet masks. Look for the interface that is connected to the network you are interested in and note the subnet mask associated with it. The subnet mask is usually displayed in CIDR notation (e.g. /24), but you can convert it to dotted decimal notation if needed using an online subnet mask calculator.

  • Anonymous

    [root@ofss-mum-2194 ~]# ip addr show
    1: lo: mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    2: ens3: mtu 9000 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:00:17:00:b2:4e brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 100.76.131.24/19 brd 100.76.159.255 scope global dynamic ens3
    valid_lft 74024sec preferred_lft 74024sec
    inet6 fe80::17ff:fe00:b24e/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    3: docker_gwbridge: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default
    link/ether 02:42:2c:6f:86:50 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 172.18.0.1/16 brd 172.18.255.255 scope global docker_gwbridge
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::42:2cff:fe6f:8650/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    4: docker0: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default
    link/ether 02:42:f7:6a:c5:f6 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 172.17.0.1/16 brd 172.17.255.255 scope global docker0
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::42:f7ff:fe6a:c5f6/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    273: veth58d5ab6@if272: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 4a:20:a0:4a:7c:79 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 1
    inet6 fe80::4820:a0ff:fe4a:7c79/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    280: vethfc07291@if279: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether be:95:42:1b:9b:97 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 4
    inet6 fe80::bc95:42ff:fe1b:9b97/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    284: veth1d8c8ac@if283: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether aa:9a:fc:87:a6:72 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 5
    inet6 fe80::a89a:fcff:fe87:a672/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    288: veth6ed9f5d@if287: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 86:da:f4:ab:13:cc brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 6
    inet6 fe80::84da:f4ff:feab:13cc/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    290: veth5fdbd6e@if289: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker0 state UP group default
    link/ether ba:e1:5d:af:6f:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 7
    inet6 fe80::b8e1:5dff:feaf:6f42/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    298: veth4c1426e@if297: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 5e:53:ed:68:12:43 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 9
    inet6 fe80::5c53:edff:fe68:1243/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    302: veth2951284@if301: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 92:ba:c2:23:d7:f0 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 10
    inet6 fe80::90ba:c2ff:fe23:d7f0/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    306: veth6e41412@if305: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether d2:17:8f:02:94:5b brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 11
    inet6 fe80::d017:8fff:fe02:945b/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    310: vethec5ca91@if309: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 26:54:08:1c:71:a8 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 12
    inet6 fe80::2454:8ff:fe1c:71a8/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    314: veth917280c@if313: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 42:67:66:dd:5e:5d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 13
    inet6 fe80::4067:66ff:fedd:5e5d/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    318: vetha1f41b0@if317: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether d2:37:2d:59:eb:58 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 14
    inet6 fe80::d037:2dff:fe59:eb58/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    322: veth1a66370@if321: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 7a:b4:ec:2b:57:d7 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 15
    inet6 fe80::78b4:ecff:fe2b:57d7/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    326: veth3777429@if325: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 92:2b:81:95:23:29 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 8
    inet6 fe80::902b:81ff:fe95:2329/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    116: veth53cd181@veth93b7dc8: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:04 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    117: veth93b7dc8@veth53cd181: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether f2:da:bc:42:59:14 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::f0da:bcff:fe42:5914/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    120: vethb2da846@vethddeb0fe: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:05 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    121: vethddeb0fe@vethb2da846: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether ea:78:34:80:65:6a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::e878:34ff:fe80:656a/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    124: veth6022d3b@veth8c3852b: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:06 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    125: veth8c3852b@veth6022d3b: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether c6:d4:d0:a9:d4:c5 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::c4d4:d0ff:fea9:d4c5/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever


    Whats the subnet mask from here for ip address 100.76.131.24, just the answer please

  • Chat GPT

    To check the subnet mask of a Linux machine, you can use the ip command in the terminal. Follow these steps:

    1. Open the terminal on your Linux machine.
    2. Type the following command and press Enter:
    sql
    ip addr show
    1. Look for the interface you want to check the subnet mask for. In this case, let's say we want to check the subnet mask for ens3.
    2. Find the line with the interface name and IP address. In this example, it is:
    sql
    2: ens3: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 9000 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:00:17:00:b2:4e brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 100.76.131.24/19 brd 100.76.159.255 scope global dynamic ens3
    valid_lft 74024sec preferred_lft 74024sec
    inet6 fe80::17ff:fe00:b24e/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    1. Look for the subnet mask, which is after the IP address and a slash (/). In this example, the subnet mask is /19, which means the subnet mask is 255.255.224.0.

    Therefore, the subnet mask of the ens3 interface in this example is 255.255.224.0.

  • Anonymous

    1: lo: mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    2: ens3: mtu 9000 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 02:00:17:00:b2:4e brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 100.76.131.24/19 brd 100.76.159.255 scope global dynamic ens3
    valid_lft 74024sec preferred_lft 74024sec
    inet6 fe80::17ff:fe00:b24e/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    3: docker_gwbridge: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default
    link/ether 02:42:2c:6f:86:50 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 172.18.0.1/16 brd 172.18.255.255 scope global docker_gwbridge
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::42:2cff:fe6f:8650/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    4: docker0: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default
    link/ether 02:42:f7:6a:c5:f6 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 172.17.0.1/16 brd 172.17.255.255 scope global docker0
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::42:f7ff:fe6a:c5f6/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    273: veth58d5ab6@if272: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 4a:20:a0:4a:7c:79 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 1
    inet6 fe80::4820:a0ff:fe4a:7c79/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    280: vethfc07291@if279: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether be:95:42:1b:9b:97 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 4
    inet6 fe80::bc95:42ff:fe1b:9b97/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    284: veth1d8c8ac@if283: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether aa:9a:fc:87:a6:72 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 5
    inet6 fe80::a89a:fcff:fe87:a672/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    288: veth6ed9f5d@if287: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 86:da:f4:ab:13:cc brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 6
    inet6 fe80::84da:f4ff:feab:13cc/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    290: veth5fdbd6e@if289: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker0 state UP group default
    link/ether ba:e1:5d:af:6f:42 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 7
    inet6 fe80::b8e1:5dff:feaf:6f42/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    298: veth4c1426e@if297: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 5e:53:ed:68:12:43 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 9
    inet6 fe80::5c53:edff:fe68:1243/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    302: veth2951284@if301: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 92:ba:c2:23:d7:f0 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 10
    inet6 fe80::90ba:c2ff:fe23:d7f0/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    306: veth6e41412@if305: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether d2:17:8f:02:94:5b brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 11
    inet6 fe80::d017:8fff:fe02:945b/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    310: vethec5ca91@if309: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 26:54:08:1c:71:a8 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 12
    inet6 fe80::2454:8ff:fe1c:71a8/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    314: veth917280c@if313: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 42:67:66:dd:5e:5d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 13
    inet6 fe80::4067:66ff:fedd:5e5d/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    318: vetha1f41b0@if317: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether d2:37:2d:59:eb:58 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 14
    inet6 fe80::d037:2dff:fe59:eb58/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    322: veth1a66370@if321: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 7a:b4:ec:2b:57:d7 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 15
    inet6 fe80::78b4:ecff:fe2b:57d7/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    326: veth3777429@if325: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state UP group default
    link/ether 92:2b:81:95:23:29 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff link-netnsid 8
    inet6 fe80::902b:81ff:fe95:2329/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    116: veth53cd181@veth93b7dc8: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:04 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    117: veth93b7dc8@veth53cd181: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether f2:da:bc:42:59:14 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::f0da:bcff:fe42:5914/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    120: vethb2da846@vethddeb0fe: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:05 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    121: vethddeb0fe@vethb2da846: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether ea:78:34:80:65:6a brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::e878:34ff:fe80:656a/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    124: veth6022d3b@veth8c3852b: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN group default
    link/ether 02:42:ac:12:00:06 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    125: veth8c3852b@veth6022d3b: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue master docker_gwbridge state LOWERLAYERDOWN group default
    link/ether c6:d4:d0:a9:d4:c5 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet6 fe80::c4d4:d0ff:fea9:d4c5/64 scope link
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever


    Whats my subnet mask?

  • Chat GPT

    This output is from the ip addr command, which shows the network interfaces and their configurations of a Linux system. Each interface is identified by a name (e.g. lo, ens3, docker_gwbridge, etc.), and has one or more IPv4 or IPv6 addresses assigned to it. The lo interface is the loopback interface, which allows the system to communicate with itself. The ens3 interface is a physical Ethernet interface with an IPv4 address assigned to it. The docker_gwbridge and docker0 interfaces are virtual network interfaces created by Docker, and are used to provide network connectivity to Docker containers. The veth* interfaces are virtual Ethernet interfaces that connect Docker containers to the Docker bridge network.

  • Anonymous

    yes my windows and linux machines have different subnet mask. Can I change the subnet mask of windows machine, if yes how?

  • Chat GPT

    Yes, you can change the subnet mask of a Windows machine. Here's how to do it:

    1. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run dialog box.
    2. Type "ncpa.cpl" and press Enter. This will open the Network Connections window.
    3. Right-click on the network adapter you want to change the subnet mask for and select Properties.
    4. In the Properties window, scroll down and select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4), and then click the Properties button.
    5. In the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) Properties window, select "Use the following IP address" and enter the new IP address and subnet mask you want to use. Make sure that the IP address you enter is in the same subnet as the other devices on your network.
    6. Click OK to save the changes.

    After you've changed the subnet mask, you may need to restart your computer or your network adapter for the changes to take effect.

  • Anonymous

    if subnet mask is same in windows and linux, would linux be able to ping my windows machine?

  • Chat GPT

    If both the Windows and Linux machines are on the same network with the same subnet mask, then they should be able to communicate with each other. This means that the Linux machine should be able to ping the Windows machine and vice versa, as long as there are no other network or firewall issues preventing the communication.

  • Anonymous

    firewalld is off, what else could have issues?

  • Chat GPT

    If firewalld is off and you are still having issues with pinging your Windows machine from Linux, there are a few other things that could be causing the problem:

    1. Network configuration: Make sure that both the Windows and Linux machines are on the same network and that their IP addresses are within the same subnet range.

    2. IP address conflict: Check that there are no IP address conflicts on the network. This can happen if two devices have been assigned the same IP address.

    3. Network connectivity: Check that both machines are connected to the network and that there are no physical issues with the network cables or hardware.

    4. Network protocol: Make sure that both machines are using the same network protocol (IPv4 or IPv6).

    5. Network services: Check that the necessary network services are running on both machines, such as DNS and DHCP.

    6. Firewall settings on other devices: Check that there are no firewalls

  • Anonymous

    firewall is generally on for my windows machine, will it prevent me from pinging from this windows IP from remote linux machine.

  • Chat GPT

    By default, Windows Firewall blocks incoming ping requests from other devices on the network. Therefore, if Windows Firewall is enabled on your Windows machine, it will prevent you from pinging the machine from a remote Linux machine.

    To allow incoming ping requests, you need to create a new inbound rule in Windows Firewall to allow ICMP traffic. Here are the steps to create the rule:

    1. Open Windows Firewall by typing "Windows Firewall" in the Start menu and selecting "Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security."
    2. Click "Inbound Rules" in the left pane, and then click "New Rule" in the right pane.
    3. Select "Custom" as the rule type, and then click "Next."
    4. Select "All programs" and click "Next."
    5. Select "ICMPv4" as the protocol type, and then click "Next."
    6. Select "Any IP address" as the remote IP address, and then click "Next."
    7. Select "Allow the connection" and then click "Next."
    8. Select the appropriate network type for the rule, and then click "Next."
    9. Enter a name and description for the rule, and then click "Finish."

    After creating the rule, your Windows machine should be able to respond to ping requests from the remote Linux machine.

  • Anonymous

    i created still not working

  • Chat GPT

    If you have created the inbound rule in Windows Firewall and it's still not working, there could be a few other things to check:

    1. Check that the rule is enabled: In Windows Firewall, click on "Advanced settings" and then click on "Inbound Rules". Look for the rule you created and make sure that it's enabled.

    2. Check that the ping command is not being blocked by any other firewall software: If you have any third-party firewall software installed on the Windows machine, make sure that it's not blocking the ping command.

    3. Check the network configuration: Make sure that the Windows machine and the Linux machine are on the same network and subnet. Also, check that there are no network issues that could be preventing the ping command from working, such as a misconfigured router or switch.

    4. Check the Windows Firewall log: If the above steps don't work, you can check the Windows Firewall log to see if the ping request is being blocked by the firewall. To do this, open Event Viewer and navigate to "Windows Logs" > "Security". Look for entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and check if there are any entries related to the ping command being blocked.

    Hopefully one of these steps will help you resolve the issue.

  • Anonymous

    Look for entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and check if there are any entries related to the ping command being blocked.

    How to check

  • Chat GPT

    You can check for entries related to the ping command being blocked in Windows Firewall with Advanced Security by following these steps:

    1. Open the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security snap-in by typing "wf.msc" in the Run dialog box (press Win+R to open the Run dialog box).

    2. In the left pane of the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security snap-in, click on "Inbound Rules".

    3. In the right pane, look for any entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and a name that indicates that it might be related to ping (such as "ICMPv4").

    4. Double-click on the entry to open its properties.

    5. In the "General" tab of the properties dialog box, check the "Enabled" setting. If it is set to "No", then this rule is not active and is not blocking ping.

    6. If the "Enabled" setting is set to "Yes", then click on the "Advanced" tab.

    7. In the "Advanced" tab, check the "Profiles" setting. If the rule is only enabled for certain network profiles (such as "Domain", "Private", or "Public"), then make sure that the appropriate profile is selected. If the rule is not enabled for any profiles, then it is not blocking ping.

    8. If the rule is enabled and is set to the appropriate profiles, then check the "Action" setting. If it is set to "Block the connection", then this rule is blocking ping. Change the "Action" setting to "Allow the connection" to allow ping.

    9. Click "OK" to save any changes you made to the rule.

  • Anonymous

    n the right pane, look for any entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and a name that indicates that it might be related to ping (such as "ICMPv4").

    Double-click on the entry to open its properties.

    I dont get it

  • Chat GPT

    Here are the steps to check for firewall rules related to ping on a Windows machine:

    1. Open the "Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security" application. You can do this by searching for "firewall" in the Windows search bar and selecting "Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security."

    2. In the left pane, select "Inbound Rules" or "Outbound Rules" depending on whether you want to check for rules related to incoming or outgoing traffic.

    3. In the right pane, look for any entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and a name that indicates that it might be related to ping (such as "ICMPv4").

    4. Double-click on the entry to open its properties.

    5. In the Properties window, go to the "Scope" tab and check if the rule applies to the correct network profile (such as "Domain," "Private," or "Public").

    6. Go to the "Advanced" tab and check if the rule is enabled.

    If the rule is not enabled, you can enable it by checking the "Enabled" checkbox on the "Advanced" tab.

    If the rule does not exist, you can create a new rule by right-clicking on the "Inbound Rules" or "Outbound Rules" folder in the left pane and selecting "New Rule." Then, follow the steps in the "New Inbound Rule Wizard" or "New Outbound Rule Wizard" to create a new rule that allows ICMP traffic (which is used by ping).

  • Anonymous

    Check the Windows Firewall log: If the above steps don't work, you can check the Windows Firewall log to see if the ping request is being blocked by the firewall. To do this, open Event Viewer and navigate to "Windows Logs" > "Security". Look for entries with a source of "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" and check if there are any entries related to the ping command being blocked.

    How to do?

  • Chat GPT

    Here are the steps to check the Windows Firewall log:

    1. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run dialog box.
    2. Type "eventvwr" in the text box and click OK.
    3. In the Event Viewer window, click on "Windows Logs" in the left pane.
    4. Click on "Security" to view the Security log.
    5. In the right pane, click on "Filter Current Log" under "Actions".
    6. In the "Filter Current Log" dialog box, select "Windows Firewall with Advanced Security" in the "Event Sources" drop-down list.
    7. In the "Keywords" field, type "Drop" or "Block" (without the quotes) and click OK.
    8. The log will now show only the entries where a packet was dropped or blocked by the firewall. Look for entries that have a protocol of ICMPv4 or ICMPv6, which are the protocols used by ping.
    9. If you find an entry where a ping packet was blocked, you can use the information in the log to create a new rule in Windows Firewall to allow ping traffic.

  • Anonymous

    Aravind S
    Linux is neither able to ping a website like google.com nor my windows IP connected in same VPN, however it is able to ping its own localhost. And traceroute to windows IP is fine. WHat does it say?

  • Chat GPT

    If Linux is able to ping its own localhost, but not able to ping other websites or the Windows IP connected in the same VPN, it suggests that there may be an issue with the network configuration of the Linux machine or the VPN connection.

    The fact that traceroute to the Windows IP is fine suggests that there may not be any issues with the routing of network traffic. However, it's possible that the network configuration on the Linux machine is not allowing outbound traffic.

    One possibility is that the Linux machine has a firewall enabled that is blocking outgoing traffic. You can check if there are any firewall rules that are blocking outgoing traffic by running the command "iptables -L -n" on the Linux machine.

    Another possibility is that there may be a DNS resolution issue. You can check if DNS resolution is working properly by running the command "nslookup google.com" on the Linux machine. If DNS resolution is not working properly, you may need to check the DNS settings on the Linux machine or in the VPN configuration.

    Overall, troubleshooting network issues can be complex and may require a more detailed analysis of the network configuration and logs. It may be helpful to consult with a network administrator or IT professional for further assistance.

  • Anonymous

    [root@ofss-mum-2194 ~]# iptables -L -n
    Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
    target prot opt source destination

    Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
    target prot opt source destination

    Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
    target prot opt source destination

    What is this, explain

  • Chat GPT

    This is the output of the iptables -L -n command on your Linux machine.

    iptables is a Linux kernel firewall and is used to manage network traffic. The iptables -L command is used to list the current firewall rules. The -n option is used to display the IP addresses and ports in numerical format instead of resolving them to hostnames and service names.

    The output shows the three default chains in the iptables firewall:

    • INPUT: This chain is used to filter incoming traffic to the local system.
    • FORWARD: This chain is used to filter traffic that is being forwarded through the system.
    • OUTPUT: This chain is used to filter outgoing traffic from the local system.

    In your case, the policy for all three chains is set to ACCEPT, which means that all traffic is allowed by default. This output indicates that there are currently no rules defined in the iptables firewall on your Linux machine.

  • Anonymous

    so iptables is fine right, also nslookup gives results.

  • Chat GPT

    Yes, if iptables is showing an empty ruleset and nslookup is able to resolve domain names to IP addresses, then there doesn't seem to be any obvious firewall or DNS issues that could be preventing the Linux machine from pinging external websites or the Windows machine in the same VPN.

    At this point, it might be worth checking if there are any network connectivity issues that could be causing the problem. You can try running some network diagnostic tools like ping, traceroute, or mtr to check if there are any network connectivity issues between the Linux machine and the outside world or the Windows machine.

  • Anonymous

    i will give the traceroute results

  • Chat GPT

    Sure, please provide the traceroute results.

  • Anonymous

    Address: 2607:f8b0:4006:80d::200e

    [root@ofss-mum-2194 ~]# ^C
    [root@ofss-mum-2194 ~]# mtr 10.166.162.161
    [root@ofss-mum-2194 ~]# mtr 10.166.191.166
    My traceroute [v0.85]
    ofss-mum-2194 (0.0.0.0) Fri Apr 28 10:34:14 2023
    Keys: Help Display mode Restart statistics Order of fields quit
    Packets Pings
    Host Loss% Snt Last Avg Best Wrst StDev
    1. 140.91.204.70 0.0% 35 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.3 0.0
    2. 10.196.6.253 0.0% 35 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.0 0.0
    3. 10.178.111.66 0.0% 35 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.3 0.0
    4. 10.178.111.17 0.0% 35 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.4 0.0
    5. 10.178.66.45 0.0% 35 1.9 1.9 1.8 2.0 0.0
    6. 10.177.34.237 2.9% 35 27.7 27.7 27.7 28.0 0.0
    7. 10.177.34.238 0.0% 35 27.8 27.8 27.7 27.9 0.0
    8. 10.177.35.209 0.0% 35 28.6 31.0 28.5 107.9 13.4
    9. 10.177.35.122 0.0% 35 29.6 29.5 28.4 33.7 1.6
    10. ???

  • Chat GPT

    The traceroute results you provided show that the packets are successfully reaching the 10.177.35.122 IP address, but then the next hop is missing and the packets are not reaching the destination 10.166.191.166. This suggests that there might be a routing issue in the network between the two hosts. You could try running the traceroute command from the Windows machine as well to see if you get similar results. If the problem persists, you might need to contact your network administrator to troubleshoot the issue.

  • Anonymous

    what can I know about 10.177.35.122?

  • Chat GPT

    ‚Äč

  • Anonymous

    if mtr fails, can I establish reverse tunneling from windows ip to linux ip?

  • Chat GPT

    MTR is a network diagnostic tool that uses ICMP packets to trace the network path between two hosts. If MTR fails, it indicates that there might be a network connectivity issue between the two hosts.

    Establishing reverse tunneling from a Windows IP to a Linux IP may be a possible solution if MTR fails. However, it depends on the specific network topology and the tools available to you.

    Reverse tunneling involves setting up a tunnel from a remote machine to a local machine, which allows you to access services on the remote machine as if they were running locally. This can be useful if you are trying to access a service on a machine behind a firewall or if you are trying to bypass network restrictions.

    There are various tools available for setting up reverse tunneling, such as SSH and VPNs. However, the specific method you use will depend on the specific requirements of your network and the tools available to you.

  • Anonymous

    MTR fails, so what does that indicate. Traceroute is succesful.

  • Chat GPT

    MTR (My traceroute) is a tool that combines the functionality of both traceroute and ping. It continuously sends packets and displays the results in real-time, providing a more detailed view of the network path between two hosts.

    If MTR fails to reach a host while traceroute is successful, it indicates that there may be an issue with the network path between the two hosts. This could be caused by a firewall blocking certain traffic or a misconfigured network device.

    It is important to note that MTR and traceroute may not always produce the same results, as they use different techniques to analyze network paths. However, if MTR consistently fails while traceroute succeeds, it is a good indication that there may be a problem with the network.

  • Anonymous

    ok. How to resolve that problem. Will SSH help ?

  • Chat GPT

    SSH might be a possible solution. You could try establishing an SSH connection from the Linux machine to the Windows machine, and then use a reverse tunnel to forward traffic from the Windows machine to the Linux machine.

    Here's how you can set up a reverse SSH tunnel:

    1. On the Linux machine, open a terminal and run the following command to create a reverse tunnel to the Windows machine:

      kotlin
      ssh -R 2222:localhost:22 user@<windows_ip_address>

      Replace user with the username of the Windows machine and <windows_ip_address> with the IP address of the Windows machine.

    2. Enter the password for the Windows machine when prompted.

    3. On the Windows machine, open a command prompt and run the following command to connect to the Linux machine:

      sql
      ssh user@localhost -p 2222

      Replace user with the username of the Linux machine.

    4. Enter the password for the Linux machine when prompted.

    Once the reverse SSH tunnel is set up, you should be able to ping the Linux machine from the Windows machine using the IP address localhost.

  • Anonymous

    i want to reverse tunnel from windows right, when to reverse tunnel from windows vs linux?

  • Chat GPT

    You would typically set up a reverse tunnel from a device that is behind a firewall or NAT, and you need to access it from another device that is not behind a firewall or NAT. In your case, if the Linux device is behind a firewall or NAT and you are unable to access it from the Windows device, you can set up a reverse tunnel from the Windows device to the Linux device.

    On the other hand, if the Windows device is behind a firewall or NAT, and you need to access it from the Linux device, you would need to set up a reverse tunnel from the Linux device to the Windows device.

  • Anonymous

    ping is not working from linux machine. Not able to ping with windows IP. so where would I reverse tunnel?

  • Chat GPT

    If ping is not working from the Linux machine to the Windows IP, then you should establish a reverse tunnel from the Windows machine to the Linux machine. This will allow you to access the Linux machine from the Windows machine via the tunnel.

  • Anonymous

    ok what is the command to reverse tunnel?

  • Chat GPT

    The command to create a reverse SSH tunnel from Windows to Linux would look something like this:

    php
    ssh -R <remote port>:localhost:<local port> <user>@<linux IP>

    Here's what the different parts of the command mean:

    • <remote port>: The port on the Linux machine that will be forwarded to the Windows machine.
    • <local port>: The port on the Windows machine that will receive the forwarded traffic.
    • <user>: The username on the Linux machine that you want to use for the SSH connection.
    • <linux IP>: The IP address of the Linux machine.

    For example, if you wanted to forward port 3389 on the Windows machine to port 22 on the Linux machine and your Linux username was "myuser" and the Linux machine's IP was "192.168.1.100", the command would look like this:

    ruby
    ssh -R 22:localhost:3389 myuser@192.168.1.100

    Note that you'll need to have SSH access to the Linux machine and the necessary permissions to create the tunnel. Additionally, you'll need to have a port on the Windows machine that you can use for the reverse tunnel.